“Ghosting” Your Employer– an Increasing Trend

A recent Washington Post article about the increase of employees quitting without providing a two-week notice has many people talking. This increasing trend, called “ghosting” by many, isn’t something employers want to happen. But some employers worry about defamation lawsuits, if they share that an employee quit without notice, on an employee reference. So what should you do if an employee does this to you? And are defamation lawsuits due to a negative reference something to be wary of? We asked employment law attorney Melissa Morales Fletcher of The Morales Firm, P.C. to provide us with some guidance on this. “There are...

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Casting the Characters in Your Case

When it comes to trial, the jury has more power than anyone else in the courtroom. As attorneys, it is our job to always think about the jury’s perspective and captivate them with our client’s story. Recently on Trial Lawyer Nation, Michael sat with trial attorney and prominent legal industry speaker, Randi McGinn. The two delved into the importance of creating your story for the jury. Randi believes the story you create should, “put the jurors in the zone of danger that your client was in; the story has to be about them, rather than your client.” Michael and Randi also discussed...

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Attorney Occupational Tax

Remember the days when you had to pay $200 for an “attorney occupation tax?” Those days are long gone now that the 84th legislature has repealed the attorney occupation tax. For many lawyers, doctors, and engineers the annual licensing fee, imposed in 1991, was a form of double taxation. “This is an example of legislative and agency effort to eliminate an unfair burden of our licensees,” stated Susan Stanford, a spokeswoman for the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. The repeal eliminates more than $300 million worth of fees over the next two years, on approximately 650,000 professionals from 16 different professions....

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